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Cataract - Symptoms, Causes and Prevention

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Summary about Cataract in Urdu

موتیا آنکھ کا ابر آلود لینس ہونے کا مسئلہ ہے۔ ایسے افراد کے لئے جو موتیا کا شکار ہیں ، ابر آلود لینز کے ذریعے دیکھنا کچھ ایسے ہی ہے جیسے ٹھنڈی یا دھندلی ہوئی ونڈو میں نظر ڈالیں۔ موتیا کی وجہ سے ابر آلود نظارہ روز مرہ کاموں کو کرنا مشکل بناتا ہے جیسے کہ پڑھنا ، کار چلانا (خاص طور پر رات کے وقت) ، یا اپنے دوست کا چہرہ دیکھنا۔

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Summary about Cataract in English

A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of your eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to do everyday tasks like reading, driving a car (especially at night), or see the expression on a friend's face.

At first, the cloudiness in your vision caused by a cataract may affect only a small part of the eye's lens and you may be unaware of any vision loss. As the cataract grows larger, it clouds more of your lens and distorts the light passing through the lens. This may lead to more noticeable symptoms.

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Symptoms of Cataract

  • Clouded, blurred or dim vision.
  • Increasing difficulty with vision at night.
  • Sensitivity to light and glare.
  • Need for brighter light for reading and other activities.
  • Seeing "halos" around lights.
  • Frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescription.
  • Fading or yellowing of colors
  • double vision in single eye

Causes of Cataract

Most cataracts develop when aging or injury changes the tissue that makes up your eye's lens. Some inherited genetic disorders that cause other health problems can increase your risk of cataracts. Cataracts can also be caused by other eye conditions, past eye surgery or medical conditions such as diabetes

Risk Factors of Cataract

  • aging
  • Trauma (sometimes causing cataracts years later)
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol use
  • Exposure to x-rays
  • Heat from infrared exposure
  • Systemic disease (eg, diabetes)
  • Uveitis
  • Systemic drugs (eg, corticosteroids)
  • Undernutrition
  • Chronic ultraviolet light exposure

Preventive Measures of Cataract

Many ophthalmologists recommend;

  •  ultraviolet-coated eyeglasses or sunglasses as a preventive measure. 
  • Reducing risk factors such as alcohol, tobacco, and corticosteroids 
  • Controlling blood glucose in diabetes delay onset
  •  A diet high in vitamin C, vitamin A, and carotenoids (contained in vegetables such as spinach and kale) may protect against cataracts.

Types of Cataract

  • Cataracts affecting the center of the lens (nuclear cataracts). ...
  • Cataracts that affect the edges of the lens (cortical cataracts). ...
  • Cataracts that affect the back of the lens (posterior subcapsular cataracts). ...
  • Cataracts you're born with (congenital cataracts).

Frequently Asked Questions

A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of your eye. For people who have cataracts, seeing through cloudy lenses is a bit like looking through a frosty or fogged-up window. Clouded vision caused by cataracts can make it more difficult to do everyday tasks like reading, driving a car (especially at night), or see the expression on a friend's face.

  • Clouded, blurred or dim vision.
  • Increasing difficulty with vision at night.
  • Sensitivity to light and glare.
  • Need for brighter light for reading and other activities.
  • Seeing "halos" around lights.
  • Frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescription.
  • Fading or yellowing of colors
  • double vision in single eye
  • aging
  • Trauma (sometimes causing cataracts years later)
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol use
  • Exposure to x-rays
  • Heat from infrared exposure
  • Systemic disease (eg, diabetes)
  • Uveitis
  • Systemic drugs (eg, corticosteroids)
  • Undernutrition
  • Chronic ultraviolet light exposure
  • Cataracts affecting the center of the lens (nuclear cataracts). ...
  • Cataracts that affect the edges of the lens (cortical cataracts). ...
  • Cataracts that affect the back of the lens (posterior subcapsular cataracts). ...
  • Cataracts you're born with (congenital cataracts).